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An Easy Guide to Start Composting At Home

Good Housekeeping Magazine

Composting not only reduces trash in landfills, but also improves your backyard at home. According to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), "compost is organic material that can be added to soil to help plants grow." That means bigger produce, prettier flowers, and a healthier garden can come at no extra cost to you once you start saving your family's scraps and turning them into "plant food."

Follow our easy steps and you'll be amazed at the change in your garden — and the amount of garbage you throw away will drastically drop, too.

Why should I compost?
It’s one of the most effective ways to minimize the amount of garbage your family sends to the landfill. Around 30% of what we throw away are food scraps and yard waste, says the EPA. Not only does this reduce methane gas, which is a major factor in global warming, but composting also controls trash can odor. And the biggest payoff? You'll be left with a rich fertilizer you can use in your own garden or donate to your favorite cause.

How can I set up a composting bin or pile?
Choose an outdoor space for your compost — you need at least 3 square feet of space — and a bin. A closed bin is a good choice if you're worried about the way your compost pile will look (or smell)! You can easily make a container, order one online (like FCMP Outdoor's best-seller), or buy one at your local hardware or gardening store. Look for a bin that's about 3 feet in diameter and not much taller than your waist. Use chicken wire or fencing to protect your bin from animals such as raccoons (or even the neighbor's dog).

What can I compost?
You can add almost anything from your kitchen and garden — some surprising organic material includes egg shells, cut flowers, coffee grounds (and paper filters), old newspapers, tea and tea bags, hair (from pets and your own hair brush!), toothpicks, and even matches.

Read the full and original article at Good Housekeeping Magazine

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